The caretaker setup in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has come up with a new plan to make do with the scarcity of funds. According to Dawn, the provincial government did not release the funds required by the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Textbook Board to publish course books due to the financial crisis in the last three years.

In the meantime, the government provided books to students free of charge.

The caretaker government of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has decided in the last cabinet meeting to reduce the size of textbooks and provide half of schoolchildren with old course books hoping this will save over three billion rupees for printing books.

RELATED STORIES

The printing of books in the upcoming academic year 2023-24 was estimated to cost Rs8.528 billion but the amount will go down to Rs5.247 billion by cutting the size of textbooks and providing 50 percent of schoolchildren with the books that were collected from the students after their promotion to next grades.


As per the report, the government is on a saving spree, and for that, 6-12 graders will be given 50 percent of old books to be collected by schools from students promoted to the next grades. The government says that only the books in good condition will be given away to students with the move saving the government Rs1.8 billion, according to the documents.


The students of grades 4-5 will use 20 percent of the old books saving the government Rs334 million.


Reducing the textbook size from nursery-grade 12 will save the government Rs. 1.1 billion.


Dawn’s Muhammad Ashfaq talked to officials in the Education department of the province who stated that downsizing of textbooks and distribution of old books to school children came “under compulsion” as the finance department didn’t release funds for printing textbooks to the board on time. They said that even the total payment of Rs 10 billion to printing companies for the previous year was done in piecemeal. This time around, printing companies have shown no interest although the bid was announced multiple times.


The officials feared a two-month learning loss for schoolchildren in the next academic year saying the publishers won’t be able to deliver orders by the end of May.